UCSF Automates CAC Scoring

UCSF is now using AI to automatically screen all of its routine non-contrast chest CTs for elevated coronary artery calcium scores (CAC scores), representing a major milestone for an AI use case that was previously limited to academic studies and future business strategies.

UCSF’s Deployment UCSF becomes the first medical center to deploy the end-to-end AI CAC scoring system that it developed with Stanford and Bunkerhill Health earlier this year. The new system automatically identifies elevated CAC scores in non-gated / non-contrast chest CTs, creating an “opportunistic screening pathway” that allows UCSF physicians to identify high-CAC patients and get them into treatment.

Why This is a Big Deal – Over 20m chest CTs are performed in the U.S. annually and each of those scans contains insights into patients’ cardiac health. However, an AI model like this would be required to extract cardiac data from the majority of CT scans (CAC isn’t visible to humans in non-gated CTs) and efficiently interpret them (there’s far too many images). This AI system’s path from academic research to clinical deployment seems like a big deal too.

The Commercial Impact – Most health systems don’t have the AI firepower of Stanford and UCSF, but they certainly produce plenty of chest CTs and should want to identify more high-risk patients while treatable (especially if they’re also risk holders). Meanwhile, there’s growing commercial efforts from companies like Cleerly and Nanox.AI to create opportunistic CAC screening pathways for all these health systems that can’t develop their own CAC AI workflows (or prefer not to).

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-- The Imaging Wire team