Artificial Intelligence

Creating a Cancer Screening Giant

A few days after shocking the AI and imaging center industries with its acquisitions of Aidence and Quantib, RadNet’s Friday investor briefing revealed a far more ambitious AI-enabled cancer screening strategy than many might have imagined.

Expanding to Colon Cancer – RadNet will complete its AI screening platform by developing a homegrown colon cancer detection system, estimating that its four AI-based cancer detection solutions (breast, prostate, lung, colon) could screen for 70% of cancers that are imaging-detectable at early stages.

Population Detection – Once its AI platform is complete, RadNet plans to launch a strategy to expand cancer screening’s role in population health, while making prostate, lung, and colon cancer screening as mainstream as breast cancer screening.

Becoming an AI Vendor – RadNet revealed plans to launch an externally-focused AI business that will lead with its multi-cancer AI screening platform, but will also create opportunities for RadNet’s eRAD PACS/RIS software. There are plenty of players in the AI-based cancer detection arena, but RadNet’s unique multi-cancer platform, significant funding, and training data advantage would make it a formidable competitor.

Geographic Expansion – RadNet will leverage Aidence and Quantib’s European presence to expand its software business internationally, as well as into parts of the US where RadNet doesn’t own imaging centers (RadNet has centers in just 7 states).

Imaging Center Upsides – RadNet’s cancer screening AI strategy will of course benefit its core imaging center business. In addition to improving operational efficiency and driving more cancer screening volumes, RadNet believes that the unique benefits of its AI platform will drive more hospital system joint ventures.

AI Financials – The briefing also provided rare insights into AI vendor finances, revealing that DeepHealth has been running at a $4M-$5M annual loss and adding Aidence / Quantib might expand that loss to $10M- $12M (seems OK given RadNet’s $215M EBITDA). RadNet hopes its AI division will become cash flow neutral within the next few years as revenue from outside companies ramp up.

The Takeaway

RadNet has very big ambitions to become a global cancer screening leader and significantly expand cancer screening’s role in society. Changing society doesn’t come fast or easy, but a goal like that reveals how much emphasis RadNet is going to place on developing and distributing its AI cancer screening platform going forward.

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-- The Imaging Wire team